Saturday, February 8, 2020

Memo Assignment Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 250 words - 9

Memo - Assignment Example Eileen whether there were other changes in the company, and only insisted on replacing Mr. Hagar as the only change. O’Connor promised to honor Mr. Hagar’s quote and showed interest and cooperation in doing business with our company. Comparing the previous terms of Miller Computing and after the changes, the terms and costs remain the same with the only difference being replacement of Mr. Hagar. Based on our discussion with the new representative, I strongly believe that Olantunji is in a better position to build stronger relationship with Miller computing. I believe that with representation of Eileen O’Connor, Miller Computing, LLC is still in a position to provide the best response to Olantunji Manufacturing. Their prices remain same as well as timing, providing Olantunji Manufacturing with sustainable efficiency and productivity and providing an avenue to manage costs according the organization’s

Wednesday, January 29, 2020

Child Labour Essay Example for Free

Child Labour Essay What is child labour? According to wikipedia, Child labour refers to the employment of children at regular and sustained labour. In many countries child labour is a well known factor for employment, especially in the under developed places. Approximately 153 million children, aged between 5 and 14 are children that work in labour. Although, child labour is recognized as being children preforming work under the age of 18. There are approximately 218 million child labourers around the world. Making children do the work that adults should be doing is morally incorrect. There are many organizations that help broadcast (describe) the issue of child labour, but overall the issue is not overly recognized. The basic, easy definition of child labour is long hours of work on a full-time, regular basis, being treated abusively by the employer, either no acces or very poor access to any education. The jobs that would be considered child labour would be selling thins on the streets or working in someone elses house as a servant. Its not so much the work itself that’s bad, but how the child is treated, how many hours a day they work and whether the work prevents school attendance. Meaning that the work is not the only bad thing, it can do some good. It is the way that the child is treated that is the worse part, if the child is treated with respect and with part time hours, as well as having access to schooling, would be a great opportunity for the child. Although, that is not the case. The children are treated with poor respect, or none, which is the number one issue, they are not treated as equals. Development cooperation and poverty reduction are central aspects of Canada’s child labour strategy The number of child labourers fell by 16 percent between 2000 and 2004. Around one in three children in Sub-Saharan Africa are workers. While the percentage of child labourers is decreasing across Africa, there are actually more children in the workforce now than 10 years ago. Out of 10 working children, seven work in agriculture, two in services and one in industry. It is estimated to take $760 billion over 20 years to eliminate child labour completely. The estimated benefit in terms of better education and health is over $4 trillion, a six-to-one difference Child labour is defined as: Its not so much the work itself that’s bad, but how the child is treated, how many hours a day they work and whether the work prevents school attendance. In the worst cases, children are trapped in these situations by debts or outright slavery. Then there are extreme kinds of child labour. One type of what are called the â€Å"worst forms† of child labour is â€Å"hazardous work,† work that is very difficult and harmful to the child’s physical development. This includes anything from carrying heavy loads and using dangerous machinery to spraying pesticides and working in unclean environments. The other worst type of child labour is called â€Å"unconditional worst forms. † That means that no matter what the circumstances are, no matter how much is paid or how little the child does, it is illegal—even for adults. Every effort must be made to end this form of labour. This includes slavery, the buying and selling of a human being (called â€Å"human trafficking†), forced or bonded labour, using children in armed conflict, prostitution, pornography and involvement in drugs or any other illegal activity. there are some 250 million children between the ages of 5 and 14 years who are in economic activity in developing countries alone.? Child labour means that they toil in mines and quarries, are exposed to chemicals in agriculture, squat in crippling positions to weave rugs and carpets, and scavenge in rubbish piles. Too many are enslaved in bonded labour, isolated in domestic service, and traumatized and abused in the commercial sex trade. according to the World Bank over 70 per cent of child workers are unpaid family workers, especially in rural areas where working girls outnumber working boys. They are engaged in domestic service, agriculture, and small family enterprises, whether in rural or urban areas. This means that four in five children are not paid, or if they are paid it is much less than most legal minimum wages These children are forced to put at stake their education, their health, their normal development to adulthood, and even risk losing their lives. Child labour and the poverty cycle are intertwined. A family living in poverty cannot send their children to school. Therefore, in order to survive, children are forced to work and therefore receive little or no education. Children who grow up without an education are much more likely to remain in low-paying (and potentially dangerous) work. It also means that girls may marry young and have children young. The cycle begins again as the young family has children to support with very little income. However, child labour should not be automatically associated with children who engage in non-harmful work. Non-harmful work is part-time and does not stop children from having access to an education. It can be beneficial in the sense that is gives them an income and the ability to help to support their families. It is also important in many instances for children to gain useful social and work-related skills. Therefore, it is vitally important to not only eliminate harmful child labour, but to also support children who do have to work so that they are able to continue their studies and gain an education. Strict bans on child labour may cause more harm than good, forcing child to work in more underground and dangerous conditions than they would otherwise. These children are forced to put at stake their education, their health, their normal development to adulthood, and even risk losing their lives. Child labour and the poverty cycle are intertwined. A family living in poverty cannot send their children to school. Therefore, in order to survive, children are forced to work and therefore receive little or no education. Children who grow up without an education are much more likely to remain in low-paying (and potentially dangerous) work. It also means that girls may marry young and have children young. The cycle begins again as the young family has children to support with very little income. However, child labour should not be automatically associated with children who engage in non-harmful work. Non-harmful work is part-time and does not stop children from having access to an education. It can be beneficial in the sense that is gives them an income and the ability to help to support their families. It is also important in many instances for children to gain useful social and work-related skills. Therefore, it is vitally important to not only eliminate harmful child labour, but to also support children who do have to work so that they are able to continue their studies and gain an education. Strict bans on child labour may cause more harm than good, forcing child to work in more underground and dangerous conditions than they would otherwise.

Tuesday, January 21, 2020

The Absurdity of Man Essay -- essays research papers

Absurdity is defined as that which is contrary to reason; clearly untrue, unreasonable or ridiculous. It is often a topic in existentialist writings relating to life. This subject is prevalent in Camus’ â€Å"The Stranger† and â€Å"The Myth of Sisyphus.† Camus depicts absurdity bringing about happiness or indifference in each of these literary works. In â€Å"The Myth of Sisyphus,† it is made clear that Sisyphus is aware that his existence is absurd. He is sentenced to an eternity of rolling a boulder up a steep mountain only to let it roll back down when it reaches its peak. His tragedy lies in the fact that he is conscious of the extent of his own misery. What makes his struggle very absurd is that he knows that there is no death at the end of it. The last sentence in this essay is in itself absurd, after describing the dilemma that Sisyphus eternally faces, Camus exclaims, â€Å"One must imagine Sisyphus happy.† This paradox is upheld because S isyphus is left refusing to recognize that there is nothing to hope for, and that he must live solely with what is known. Sisyphus’ redemption is seen in his ongoing struggle against the absurd. In â€Å"The Stranger†, Meursault does not realize his absurd situation until the end of the novel. It is illustrated, however, in his indifference toward life and lack of emotion throughout. In the beginning of the novel, Meursault is seen as a detached observer of life who is devoted to appreciating sensation. His physical wants and needs overpower his reason and...

Monday, January 13, 2020

A Study of Sergei Eisenstein’s Montage Theory Essay

Cinema is a visual concept heavily marked by the objective of enterntainment, yet is also an ideology that is subject to a whole universe of theoretical frameworks. Many of it may trace their beginnings to a technique, as with the montage, which in French means â€Å"putting together†. This is the solid base of Russian cinema, more specifically in the montage theory subscribed to by Russian filmmakers. It is defined as a cinematic approach that depends mainly on editing, and the value of cuts in a film. In this revolutionary philosophy in cinema, probably the most recognized name is that of Sergei Eisenstein. Eisenstein was born to Jewish parents in Tsarist Russia in 1898, and was educated in Riga and St. Petersburg. He learned to speak a number of languages fluently, and was urged by his father to follow his path of becoming a civil engineer. Nonetheless, the young Eisenstein already had serious interests in theatre, and spent all of his free time watching films. The Bolshevik Revolution further reinforced his penchant for cinema, as he found himself educating workers, peasants, and troops in remote areas with camera in hand—and a gun in the other. Cinema was then perceived as a weapon by Eisenstein, a belief he would carry with him for the rest of his filmmaking career (Jonas, 1998). II, The Soviet Montage Soviet montage films were defined by its own set of values, not necessarily just techniques, but executed in a specific way. The socialist thinking was obviously present in this style, for individual characters in these films had no place as focal points. Social classes are the main issues, and the role of each character is to represent one. Various organized protests are also common elements of the film’s narrative, echoing the Russian revolution experience. Eisenstein formulated the system that resulted in a Synthesis, starting with a Thesis, followed by an Anti-Thesis—a foundation of the montage that traces its origins to Marxist themes of human history and experience being in perpetual conflict wherein a force clashes with a counterforce; the product of this encounter would be a new idea or concept, something absolutely greater than its origins (Karpenko, 2002). The montage style utilized editing and the resulting film cuts to generate reactions from the audience, usually in ways that defy convention. This contradicts traditional continuity editing, which shows scenes as they happen chronologically or at least in the same time realm; montage cutting produced overlapping or elliptical time relations between cuts. Most exemplary of this technique is Eisenstein’s Strike, where he juxtaposed scenes of two separate characters and time frames via jump cuts. In the series showing a police officer and a butcher, the editing serves a particular purpose—relate the connection between the acts being done by the officer and the butcher, in this case portray the idea that the workers were being slaughtered, just like animals. Eisenstein introduced his theory of intellectual montage, fully at work in this film by showing conflict in the juxtaposition of unrelated shots (Trischak, 1998). Eisenstein called montage a merge of opposites in art, through unity and conflict. He created this theory primarily to go against film tradition, negating the lack of character and stimulus in the logical editing of films. He listed several categories of montage, as well as the purpose of each: 1. Metric Montage. Shots are edited together according to their measured length, and are arranged according to a measure of music. Tension is invariably produced by the combination of short shots and the expected flow of melody or tone. 2. Rhythmic Montage. Compared to metric montage, action is given equal importance as the shot’s length, allowing for occasional conflicts between the montage’s rhythm and movement. An example would be the Odessa steps sequence in Battleship Potemkin, where the shot showing soldiers marching does not match the editing rhythm. This violates all metric requirements, effecting absolute tension and prepares the viewer for the iconic baby carriage scene. 3. Tonal Montage. Generally a level higher than metric montage, this style is created by the specific scene’s emotional tone. Vakulnichuk’s death in Potemkin, somber and sedate, appears in complete contrast to the steps sequence’s fast cuts. With each shot’s length at five seconds, this sequence serves as caesura, or a device to provide transition from the previous scene of violence to the citizens’ angry demonstrations. The similarities between rhythmic and tonal montage can be clearly seen as they both operate via the actions shown within each frame (HATII, 2008).

Sunday, January 5, 2020

Impact of the Gulf War, September 11th, and the War in...

The Constitution of the United States is the supreme law of the United States of America. It was completed on September, 1787, with its adoption by the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and was later ratified by special conventions in each of the original thirteen states. It created a more unified and defined government in place of what was then a group of free and independent states operating under the Articles of Confederation. During its history there have been a numerous number of events which have occurred which have seriously tested this Constitution After conflicts in South Korea, the two World Wars and Vietname the next conflict to have tested the Constitution was†¦show more content†¦With George Bush Snr defeating Sadaam Hussein and ordering him and his trrops withdrawal from Kuwait this was deemed to be going against the Constitution. This is because America and George Bush were imposing themselves on a foreign country and determined how they were to conduct themselves. There was no justification for their involvement. Having previously defeat the Soviet Union there was no oppostion to America and they were seen as the only ‘Super Power’. With the concept of Seperation of Power being upheld in America, Internationally, this was not the case as there was no form of checks and balances, there was no one to question America so they done what they percieved to be correct. They were imposing their own from of government on foreign land, this goes against the Constitution and the 6 defining principles which make up the Constitution. The next challenge on the Constitution was the attack on the World Trade Centres on September 11th 2001. The September 11, 2001 attacks were a series of suicide attacks against the United States conducted on Tuesday, September 11, 2001. According to the official 9/11 Commission Report, nineteen men affiliated with Osama bin Laden and Al-Qaeda, a loose network of Sunni Islamist terrorists, simultaneously hijacked four U.S. domestic commercial airliners. Two were crashed into the World Trade Center in Manhattan, New York City — oneShow MoreRelatedEssay on Privacy vs. Security2616 Words   |  11 PagesPresident declared war against terrorism, an implicit war was declared against some of our freedoms. In particular, most Americans were more willing to let the government into their lives and forfeit some privacy in the name of increased security. The events of September 11, 2001 affected not only the United States, but the entire world as well. After the fall of the Soviet Union, the world was left with one remaining superpower. The United States proved in Afghanistan and Iraq that it has theRead MoreThe Consequences of the Bushs Policies2897 Words   |  12 PagesOn September 11th, 2001, Al Qaeda terrorists flew two planes into the World Trade Center in New York and one into the Pentagon in Washington, D.C. killing over 3000 individuals and destroying the World Trade Center. Al Qaeda intended to psychologically cause panic and fear in the United States (U.S.) through the use of terror because Al Qaeda wanted to influence U.S. foreign policy. Goldstein and Peverhouse explain, â€Å"Terrorism refers to political violence that targets civilians deliberately andRead MoreChanges in Foreign Policies, Culture, and Domestic Policies After 9/112276 Words   |  10 Pages The terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 change d the skyscape of New York City. They also changed the political, economic, and cultural landscape of the United States. September 11th showed Americans that not even the strongest military country in the world can protect its citizens from terrorism. The changes in America since 9/11 have not only impacted Americans but have impacted citizens of other nations worldwide. This infamous day in history had the power to turn the world upsideRead More How the US Government uses the media to influence its enemies5973 Words   |  24 Pagestendency to vacillate over time depending on sways in the current US agenda (for example Iraq, Taliban, Russia). Those countries that are our enemies, for example the â€Å"Axis of Evil†, are openly and obviously the subjects of Whitehouse media influence during formal press meetings[1]. Currently, this has been taking place on a daily basis with Whitehouse officials sending direct messages to Iraq and the Iraq people. On the other end of the spectrum, the Whitehouse Administration’s enemies canRead MoreNational Security Outline Essay40741 Words   |  163 Pages The Laws of War and Neutrality 24 CHAPTER 7: War Crimes and Nuremberg Principle 28 CHAPTER 12: Nuclear Weapons: Deployment, Targeting and Deterrence 33 CHAPTER 13: Arms Control in the Nuclear Age 36 Chapter 14: Measures to Reduce Tensions and Prevent War 41 CHAPTER 16: The Law of the Sea 43 CHAPTER 17: The Constitutional Framework for the Division of Nat’l Security Powers Between Congress, the President and the Court 48 The 1973 War Powers Resolution 49 II. The War Powers Resolution:Read MoreOne Significant Change That Has Occurred in the World Between 1900 and 2005. Explain the Impact This Change Has Made on Our Lives and Why It Is an Important Change.163893 Words   |  656 PagesHistory of Southern Life Lisa M. Fine, The Story of Reo Joe: Work, Kin, and Community in Autotown, U.S.A. Van Gosse and Richard Moser, eds., The World the Sixties Made: Politics and Culture in Recent America Joanne Meyerowitz, ed., History and September 11th John McMillian and Paul Buhle, eds., The New Left Revisited David M. Scobey, Empire City: The Making and Meaning of the New York City Landscape Gerda Lerner, Fireweed: A Political Autobiography Allida M. Black, ed., Modern American QueerRead MoreLogical Reasoning189930 Words   |  760 Pagesword? a. I hate you. Get out of here! b. Im sure Martin Luther King Jr. didnt die during the 1960s, because it says right here in the encyclopedia that he was assassinated in Memphis in 1998. c. The Republican Party began back in the 1850s as a U.S. political party. Abraham Lincoln was their first candidate to win the presidency. d. I don’t believe you when you say Martin Luther King Jr. could have been elected president if he hadn’t been assassinated. Try to discipline yourself to read andRead MoreStephen P. Robbins Timothy A. Judge (2011) Organizational Behaviour 15th Edition New Jersey: Prentice Hall393164 Words   |  1573 PagesHyde 33 Case Incident 1 â€Å"Lessons for ‘Undercover’ Bosses† 34 Case Incident 2 Era of the Disposable Worker? 35 vii viii CONTENTS 2 2 The Individual Diversity in Organizations 39 Diversity 40 Demographic Characteristics of the U.S. Workforce 41 †¢ Levels of Diversity 42 †¢ Discrimination 42 Biographical Characteristics 44 Age 44 †¢ Sex 46 †¢ Race and Ethnicity 48 †¢ Disability 48 †¢ Other Biographical Characteristics: Tenure, Religion, Sexual Orientation, and Gender Identity 50 AbilityRead More_x000C_Introduction to Statistics and Data Analysis355457 Words   |  1422 Pagesnonstatisticians. A subsection entitled â€Å"A Word to the Wise† reminds students of things that must be considered in order to ensure that statistical methods are used in reasonable and appropriate ways. The time-series plot shown in Figure 3.34 appears on the U.S. Census Bureau web site. It shows the average earnings of workers by educational level as a proportion of the average earnings of a high school graduate over time. For example, we can see from this plot that in 1993 the average earnings for people with

Saturday, December 28, 2019

The Story of Nat Turners Rebellion

Nat Turner’s Rebellion was an intensely violent episode which broke out in August 1831 when slaves in southeastern Virginia rose up against white residents of the area. During a two-day rampage, more than 50 whites were killed, mostly by being stabbed or hacked to death. The leader of the slave uprising, Nat Turner, was an unusually charismatic character. Though born a slave, he had learned to read. And he was reputed to possess knowledge of scientific subjects. He was also said to experience religious visions, and would preach religion to his fellow slaves. While Nat Turner was able to draw followers to his cause, and organize them to commit murder, his ultimate purpose remains elusive. It was widely assumed that Turner and his followers, numbering about 60 slaves from local farms, intended to flee into a swampy area and essentially live outside society. Yet they didnt seem to make any serious effort to leave the area.   It is possible Turner believed he could invade the local county seat, seize weapons, and make a stand. But the odds of surviving a counterattack from armed citizens, local militia, and even federal troops, would have been remote. Many of the participants in the rebellion, including Turner, were captured and hanged. The bloody uprising against the established order failed. Yet Nat Turner’s Rebellion lived on in popular memory. The slave insurrection in Virginia in 1831 left a long and bitter legacy. The violence unleashed was so shocking that severe measures were put in place to make it more difficult for slaves to learn to read and to travel beyond their homes. And the slave uprising led by Turner would influence attitudes about slavery for decades. Anti-slavery activists, including William Lloyd Garrison and others in the abolitionist movement, saw the actions of Turner and his band as a heroic effort to break the chains of slavery. Pro-slavery Americans, startled and deeply alarmed by the sudden outbreak of violence, began to accuse the small but vocal abolitionist movement of actively motivating slaves to revolt. For years, any action taken by the abolitionist movement, such as the pamphlet campaign of 1835, would be interpreted as an attempt to inspire those in bondage to follow the example of Nat Turner. Life of Nat Turner Nat Turner was born a slave on October 2, 1800, in Southampton County, in southeastern Virginia. As a child he exhibited unusual intelligence, quickly learning to read. He later claimed he could not recall learning to read; he just set about to do it and essentially acquired reading skills spontaneously. Growing up, Turner became obsessed with reading the Bible, and became a self-taught preacher in a slave community. He also claimed to experience religious visions. As a young man, Turner escaped from an overseer and fled into the woods. He remained at large for a month, but then voluntarily returned. He related the experience in his confession, which was published following his execution: About this time I was placed under an overseer, from whom I  ran away —and after remaining in the woods thirty days, I returned, to the astonishment of the negroes on the plantation, who thought I had made my escape to some other part of the country, as my father had done before.But the reason of my return was, that the Spirit appeared to me and said I had my wishes directed to the things of this world, and not to the kingdom of Heaven, and that I should return to the service of my earthly master — For he who knoweth his Masters will,  and doeth it not, shall be beaten with many stripes, and thus, have I chastened you. And the negroes found fault, and  murmured against me, saying that if they had my sense they would not serve any master in the world.And about this time I had a vision — and I saw white spirits and black spirits engaged in battle, and the sun was darkened — the thunder rolled in the Heavens, and blood flowed in streams — and I h eard a voice saying, Such is your luck, such you are called to see, and let it come rough or smooth, you must surely bear it.I now withdrew myself as much as my situation would permit, from the intercourse of my fellow servants, for the avowed purpose of serving the Spirit more fully--and it appeared to me, and reminded me of the things it had already shown me, and that it would then reveal to me the knowledge of the elements, the revolution of the planets, the operation of tides, and changes of the seasons.After this revelation in the year 1825, and the knowledge of the elements being made known to me, I sought more than ever to obtain true holiness before the great day of judgment should appear, and then I began to receive the true knowledge of faith. Turner also related that he began to receive other visions. One day, working in the fields, he saw drops of blood on ears of corn. Another day he claimed to have seem images of men, written in blood, on leaves of trees. He interpreted the signs to mean a great day of judgment was at hand. In early 1831 a solar eclipse was interpreted by Turner as a sign that he should act. With his experience of  preaching to other slaves, and he was able to organize a small band to follow him.   The Rebellion In Virginia On a Sunday afternoon, August 21, 1831, a group of four slaves gathered in the woods for a barbecue. As they cooked a pig, Turner joined them, and the group apparently formulated the final plan to attack nearby white landowners that night. In the early morning hours of August 22, 1831, the group attacked the family of the man who owned Turner. By stealthily entering the house, Turner and his men surprised the family in their beds, killing them by slashing them to death with knives and axes. After leaving the familys house, Turners accomplices realized they had left a baby sleeping in a crib. They returned to the house and killed the infant. The brutality and efficiency of the killings would be repeated throughout the day. And as more slaves joined Turner and the original band, the violence quickly escalated. In various small groups, slaves armed with knives and axes would ride up to a house, surprising the residents, and quickly murder them. Within about 48 hours more than 50 white residents of Southampton County were murdered. Word of the outrages spread quickly. At least one local farmer armed his slaves, and they helped fight off a band of Turners disciples. And at least one poor white family, who owned no slaves, were spared by Turner, who told his men to ride past their house and leave them alone. As the groups of rebels struck farmsteads they tended to collect more weapons. Within a day the improvised slave army had obtained firearms and gunpowder. It has been assumed that Turner and his followers may  have intended to march on the county seat of Jerusalem, Virginia, and seize weapons stored there. But a group of armed white citizens managed to find and attack a group of Turners followers before that could happen. A number of rebellious slaves were killed and wounded in that attack, and the rest scattered into the countryside. Nat Turner managed to escape and evade detection for a month. But he was eventually chased down and surrendered. He was imprisoned, put on trial, and hanged. Impact of Nat Turners Rebellion The insurrection in Virginia was reported in a Virginia newspaper, the Richmond Enquirer, on August 26, 1831. The initial reports said local families had been killed, and considerable military force might be required to subdue the disturbers. The article in the Richmond Enquirer mentioned that militia companies were riding to Southampton County, delivering supplies of arms and ammunition. The newspaper, in the same week as the rebellion had occurred, was calling out for vengeance: But that these wretches will rue the day on which they broke loose upon the neighboring population is most certain. A terrible retribution will fall upon their heads. Dearly will they pay for their madness and misdeeds. In the following weeks, newspapers along the East Coast carried news of what was generally termed an insurrection. Even in an era before the penny press and the telegraph, when news still traveled by letter on ship or horseback, accounts from Virginia were published widely. After Turner was captured and jailed, he provided a confession in a series of interviews. A book of his confession was published, and it remains the primary account of his life and deeds during the uprising. As fascinating as Nat Turners confession is, it should probably be considered with some skepticism. It was published, of course, by a white man who was not sympathetic to Turner or to the cause of the enslaved. So its presentation of Turner as perhaps delusional may have been an effort to portray his cause as utterly misguided. Legacy of Nat Turner The abolitionist movement often invoked Nat Turner as a heroic figure who rose up to fight against oppression. Harriet Beecher Stowe, the author of Uncle Toms Cabin, included a portion of Turners confession in the appendix of one of her novels. In 1861, the abolitionist author Thomas Wentworth Higginson, wrote an account of Nat Turners Rebellion for the Atlantic Monthly. His account placed the story in historical context just as the Civil War was beginning. Higginson was not merely an author, but had been an associate of John Brown, to the extent that he was identified as one of the Secret Six who helped finance Browns 1859 raid on a federal armory. John Browns ultimate goal when he launched his raid on Harpers Ferry was to inspire a slave rebellion and succeed where Nat Turners Rebellion, and an earlier slave rebellion planned by Denmark Vesey, had failed.

Thursday, December 19, 2019

Langston Hughes, A Prominent And Influential Figure During...

Langston Hughes was a prominent and influential figure during the Harlem Renaissance. Hughes published many works of literature during the 1920s. However, he often neglected to develop a specific subject in his writing, and instead wrote about the common man. The black community was upset with him because they thought he depicted the adversity and negative aspects of black life. The poem I Too exemplifies the matter of the lack of development of a central character. At first glimpse of the poem, one might believe that the poem is written from an oppressed black person’s perspective. However, after further analyzing the true meaning of the poem, the speaker of the poem becomes indistinguishable. The outlook of the poem is clearly stated through a black person’s lens, but the background of the black person is unknown. This poem could have been written from a variety of different upbringings of black people: a past slave, a current servant, or even a black person who was forever free. The criticism Hughes faced for supposedly writing about the hardships black people endured is quite clear because there is no distinct subject of this poem. The black community of the Harlem Renaissance celebrated writing and music to alleviate the pain they endured through history up until that point. Sadly, Hughes’ I Too does not alleviate that pain. Instead, it acts as a deterrent to the joy blacks experienced during the Harlem Renaissan ce because his poem has a high degree ofShow MoreRelatedHarlem And The Middle Of The 1930s1791 Words   |  8 PagesThe Harlem Renaissance was the name given to the cultural, social, and artistic explosion that took place in Harlem, New York between the conclusion of World War I and the middle of the 1930s. During this period, Harlem was a cultural center, drawing black writers, artists, musicians, photographers, poets, and scholars. Many had come from the South, fleeing its oppressive caste system in order to find a place where they could freely express their talents; this became known as The Great MigrationRead MoreAnalysis Of Langston Hughes And His Harlem Dream1639 Words   |  7 PagesLangston Hughes and His Harlem Dream The 1900s found many African Americans migrating from the south to north of the United States in an event called the Great Migration. Many Southern African-Americans migrated to a place called Harlem and this is where the Harlem renaissance originated from. The Harlem renaissance began just after the first world war and lasted into the early years of the great depression. Harlem became the cynosure for blues and jazz and birthed forth a Negro Artist era calledRead MoreLangston Hughes And The Harlem Renaissance1909 Words   |  8 PagesThe Harlem Renaissance was a social and cultural movement aimed to alter the conventional notion of â€Å"The Negro† and to expound on African American’s adversities through literature, music, and visual arts. After World War I, Harlem, New York became a central location for African Americans for greener pastures and racial equality. Large quantities of black writers, artists, and intellectuals emerged within the urban scene and played a pivotal role of defining the movement in their respective fieldsRead MoreHarlem Renaissance Essay1069 Words   |  5 PagesHARLEM RENAISSANCE Throughout the history of African Americans, there have been important historical figures as well as times. Revered and inspirational leaders and eras like, Martin Luther King and the Civil Rights Movement, Nat Turner and the slave revolt, or Huey Newton and the Black Panther Party. One such period that will always remain a significant part of black art and culture is the Harlem Renaissance. It changed the meaning of art and poetry, as it was known then. Furthermore, theRead More The Harlem Renaissance Essay1031 Words   |  5 PagesHARLEM RENAISSANCE Throughout the history of African Americans, there have been important historical figures as well as times. Revered and inspirational leaders and eras like, Martin Luther King and the Civil Rights Movement, Nat Turner and the slave revolt, or Huey Newton and the Black Panther Party. One such period that will always remain a significant part of black art and culture is the Harlem Renaissance. It changed the meaning of art and poetry, as it was known then. Furthermore, theRead MoreNarrative Of The Life Of Frederick Douglass Essay1792 Words   |  8 Pagesdescribes the pitiful rations of food received by the enslaved. 3. Explain the following regarding the Harlem Renaissance (1919-1940) Definition- Harlem Renaissance, a cultural, social, and artistic explosion that took place in Harlem, New York, spanned the 1920s. During the time, it was known as the New Negro Movement, named after the 1925 anthology by Alain Locke. ... The Harlem Renaissance was considered to be a rebirth of African-American arts. Black artist’s common goal- The black artist’sRead MoreHarlem Renaissance Essay1048 Words   |  5 PagesThe Harlem Renaissance was a significant historical movement that originated in Harlem, New York and helped establish the city as an African American cultural center. This period, which lasted from the 1910s to the mid 1930s, is considered a golden age for African American music, art, literature, and performance. As a resurgence of African American art and urbanization began to form, new artistic and social expression began to simultaneously develop in other urban areas as well. The Harlem RenaissanceRead MoreThe Harlem Renaissance and Its Effect on African American Literature3258 Words   |  14 PagesThe Harlem Renaissance and its Effect on African American Literature Thesis: The literary movement during the Harlem Renaissance was a raging fire that brought about new life for the African American writer; its flame still burns today through the writings of contemporary African American writers. I. The Harlem Renaissance- Its Beginning and Development II. The Major Writers A. Claude McKay B. Jean Toomer C. Countee Cullen D. Langston Hughes E. Zora Neale Hurston IIIRead MoreThe Legacy Of African Americans2320 Words   |  10 Pagesthe notable African American poets of the past who have paved the way. There are many great African American artists that were very talented poets. Artists such as Langston Hughes, Countee Cullen, and Gwendolyn Bennett are just a few African Americans who had a momentous influence on writing and poetry in our culture. The Harlem Renaissance was an era when African Americans embraced their talents and created incredible artworks and excelled in certain artistic outlets. These areas ranged from EntertainersRead MoreThe Harlem Renaissance By Langston Hughes1703 Words   |  7 Pagesis a quote from a well-known poet by the name of Langston Hughes who served as a prominent figure in African American history and is known for maintaining a significant role in one of the most culturally influential periods for African Americans -The Harlem Renaissance. The Harlem Renaissance describes a significant era in time where hundreds or artists, writers and musicians living in Harlem came together to form a vibrant, creative community. Hughes along with many other talented and innovative African